Publications

  • Gauging the Revised California School Dashboard

    Morgan S. Polikoff. Policy Analysis for California Education. February 2019

    Late in 2018, the California Department of Education rolled out an updated version of the California School Dashboard. This revision altered the look and feel of the Dashboard and added new indicators based on newly available data. This brief updates a 2018 analysis of the Dashboard. First, I examine whether the state’s revisions are in line with the suggestions made in the 2018 report. I find that the state has made some improvements to the system, but that there is room for continued improvement.

  • The Governor’s Budget Proposal and Getting Down to Facts II: Evidence to Inform Policy

    Heather Hough, Jeannie Myung. Policy Analysis for California Education. February 2019

    Governor Newsom’s first Budget Proposal increases funding for education in California. There are areas of substantive overlap in the Budget Proposal and research findings from the Getting Down to Facts II (GDTFII) research project, released in September 2018, which built an evidence base on the current status of California education and implications for paths forward. As the Budget moves from proposal to reality, it is critical that the evidence from GDTFII continues to inform the policy process.

  • Californians and Public Education: Views from the 2019 PACE/USC Rossier Poll

    Morgan S. Polikoff, Heather Hough, Julie A. Marsh, David N. Plank. Policy Analysis for California Education. February 2019

    With a new governor, state superintendent and legislators in Sacramento and a diminished federal role in education, there is an opportunity for California’s leaders to take stock of recent educational reforms and make necessary improvements. There are also a host of new and looming issues in K-12 and higher education. As California’s leaders confront these and other issues, where do California voters, including parents, stand on education and education policy? The newest edition of the USC Rossier/PACE Poll shares voter perspectives on a wide range of education issues.

  • Addressing Absenteeism

    Michael A. Gottfried, Ethan L. Hutt. Policy Analysis for California Education. February 2019

    Addressing student absenteeism continues to permeate education policy and practice. California and a majority of other states have incorporated “chronic absenteeism” as an accountability metric under the Every Student Succeeds Act. It is therefore a crucial time to take stock of what we know on the research, policy, and practice to better understand the measurement of student absenteeism and how to reduce it. To further this goal and spark a broader conversation about student attendance as a valuable policy lever, we wrote the first book centered on the issue of school absenteeism.

  • Chronic Absence in California: What New Dashboard Data Reveals About School Performance

    Kevin Gee, Christopher Kim. Policy Analysis for California Education. February 2019

    In this policy brief, we describe the chronic absence performance levels of California’s districts, schools, and student groups using newly released data from California’s School Dashboard. We also examine the role that chronic absence plays in determining differentiated assistance. For schools with very high chronic absence rates (above 20 percent), nearly two thirds reported increases while about a third reported declines from the previous year.

  • Engaging District, School, and Teacher Leaders in Improvement

    H. Alix Gallagher, Angela Gong, Heather Hough, Kate E. Kennedy, Taylor N. Allbright, Eupha Jeanne Daramola. Policy Analysis for California Education. January 2019

    California’s shift towards continuous improvement in education makes understanding how districts and schools can learn to improve a more pressing question than ever. The CORE Improvement Community (CIC), a network of California school districts engaged in learning about improvement together, is an important testing ground to learn about what this work entails. 

  • Principals’ Perceptions: Implementing The Local Control Funding Formula

    Julia E. Koppich. January 2019

    In fall 2018, the Local Control Funding Formula Research Collaborative (LCFFRC) conducted surveys of stratified random samples of California superintendents and principals. Superintendent results were published in June 2018 in Superintendents Speak: Implementing the Local Control Funding Formula. This report, Principals’ Perceptions: Implementing the Local Control Funding Formula, is the companion account of principal survey results.

  • Special Education in California Schools: The Challenges and Solutions from Multiple Perspectives

    Sherrie Reed. January 2019

    This PACE policy brief identifies needed additional policy action needed to increase equity and improve outcomes for students with disabilities that persist in many school districts. The brief also highlights the endeavors of several public school districts where district leaders, school administrators, and classroom teachers are finding ways to meet the needs of students with disabilities in the current policy context.

  • What is California’s High School Graduation Rate?

    Cameron Sublett, Russell Rumberger. Policy Analysis for California Education. December 2018

    This report examines high school graduation rates in California. It reviews the various approaches to calculating high school graduation rates, focusing on the challenges and limitations of the most widely used rate, the Four-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate (ACGR).

  • Advancing Equity Through the Local Control Funding Formula: Promising Practices

    Julia E. Koppich. December 2018

    California’s Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) ushered in a new era for California education policy. Enacted in 2013, the LCFF shifted control of most education dollars from the state to local school districts, allowing them to determine how to allocate their resources to best meet the needs of the students in their community. The LCFF also made it a matter of state policy to shine a spotlight on educational inequities and try to give districts the wherewithal to level the playing field for students who too often are left behind.

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